PT/EN

A AIM - Associação de Investigadores da Imagem em Movimento é uma associação que procura reunir os investigadores e promover a investigação da "Imagem em Movimento". O VII Encontro Anual irá decorrer de 10 a 13 de maio de 2017, na Universidade do Minho (Braga). Conheça também a Aniki : Revista Portuguesa da Imagem em Movimento, uma publicação científica da AIM, e a BDIM - Base de Dados de Investigações Científicas sobre Imagem em Movimento.
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NOTÍCIAS

Lecturer Level B - Creative Arts and Screen Studies

Lecturer Level B - Creative Arts and Screen Studies


Develop and maintain relevant industry connections with the discipline
Continuing, full-time role based at our Melbourne (Bundoora) campus
$87,891 - $104366 per annum plus up to 17% superannuation

About La Trobe

La Trobe University's success is driven by people who are committed to making a difference. They are creative and highly motivated, pursue new ideas and create knowledge. La Trobe is among the top 100 universities in the world under the age of 50 (Times Higher Education Rankings 2016), one of Australia's research leaders, and the largest provider of higher education to regional Victoria. Our teaching and research address some of the most significant issues of our time and we're passionate about driving change to benefit the communities we serve.

About the role

Develop curriculum, teach and undertake scholarly work relevant to the Department of Creative Arts and English. This role is located in the disciplines of Creative Arts and Screen Studies. You will develop, coordinate and teach in a way that engages students through tutorials, classes, workshops, excursions, and studio sessions. You will also participate in innovative course level design, development and review while keeping up to date with teaching innovations and industry possibilities in relation to screenwriting and production. Publish or disseminate high quality and high impact research as a member of a team or independently. Supervise or co-supervise Higher Degree by Research students. You will also seek to obtain research funding from external funding sources.

Skills & Experience

To be successful in this role you will possess a PhD in a relevant discipline or the equivalent. You will be a competent practitioner and teacher who is capable of developing curriculum. Evidence of high quality research and/or relevant industry experience, relative to opportunity, is required. You will be able to supervise or co-supervise students. You will possess strong analytical, organisational, and communication skills. The ability to work collaboratively and productively with a diverse range of staff and students is also essential.

Benefits

Please click on this link for a full list of Benefits http://www.latrobe.edu.au/jobs/working/benefits

How to Apply

Closing date: 23 December 2016

Position Enquiries: Dr Hester Joyce Creative Arts and English Melbourne +61 3 9479 1422 /

Position Description below:
https://www.seek.com.au/job/32324938?pos=1&ref=beta&tier=no_tier&type=standard&userqueryid=11b2a912cd714a46f06d1de36e9963eb-5217389&whereid=3000

PD - Lecturer Level B -(HUSS- Creative Arts & Screen Studies)(Continuing, full-time).pdf

Please address Key Selection Criteria from the attached position description and attach these with your application.

Please scroll down to apply.

*************************************

La Trobe University is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


For further enquiries on how to apply for this role, please contact Kerryn Harbert, Recruitment Advisor on +61 (03) 9479 1623.

La Trobe is proud to be a member of the SAGE Athena SWAN program to advance gender equality in academia.
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CFP: DEVIRES - Cinema e Humanidades


DEVIRES - Cinema e Humanidades



CHAMADA PARA APRESENTAÇÃO DE ARTIGOS

Dossiê "Cinema e Escrita de Si"



A produção cinematográfica marcadamente subjetiva, performativa ou realizada em nome próprio, na primeira pessoa do singular, tem problematizado os modos pelos quais a subjetividade contemporânea se constitui na imagem e por meio da imagem. Nesse panorama, a ampliação das possibilidades de produção audiovisual (com o incremento das produções domésticas, dos filmes-diário, dos ensaios audiovisuais, dos documentários performativos e dos relatos testemunhais de todo tipo), somada aos novos modos de circulação, compartilhamento e consumo desses materiais em sites e redes sociais, intensificou e deu novos contornos às formas de constituição e expressão de si no campo da imagem, configurando um heterogêneo e dialógico “espaço biográfico” (Arfuch, 2008).

Corremos contra o tempo para entendermos e nos posicionar frente a um fenômeno cultural, subjetivo e social que aponta para um limite tênue, e muitas vezes problemático, entre o ético e o estético: trata-se de uma exposição de si sem vínculos com a dimensão do comum e do coletivo, ancorada apenas no espetáculo do “show do eu” (Sibilia, 2016)? Ou trata-se de formas de experimentação de si que nos afastam das identidades fechadas e nos colocam frente à dimensão relacional, mutante, inacabada e faltante das subjetividades partilhadas? Com efeito, a inflação ou hipertrofia da subjetividade contemporânea pode ser vista apenas como sintoma do mundo atual, mas pode também resistir a esse mundo, ao interrogar as interseções entre as esferas pública e privada, a história e a memória, o íntimo e o êxtimo, o pessoal e o político.

A partir dessas questões, o Dossiê “Cinema e Escritas de si” propõe pensar o cinema como experiência sensível que captura, resiste, elabora, reflete, desconstrói, reconstrói e deixa-se atravessar, de diferentes maneiras, por variadas formas de autobiografia e expressão subjetiva. Dedicando-se à análise de um cinema de escrita pessoal (íntima, familiar, doméstica) e de seus procedimentos de linguagem, recursos estilísticos e estratégias formais; ao mapeamento de cineastas e obras; bem como ao estudo das teorias e dos gêneros confessionais (entre eles o documentário performativo, o cinema ensaio, o filme de família, o diário filmado etc.), o Dossiê “Cinema e Escritas de si” visa investigar e interrogar os trânsitos entre os âmbitos público e privado, poético e político, pessoal e coletivo – problematizando o “teor testemunhal” da cultura em uma sociedade mediada pela imagem e tensionando a relação entre as formas da intimidade e os mecanismos de visibilidade, os modos de solidão e as possibilidades de comunhão.



Submissões pelo site: http://www.fafich.ufmg.br/devires/index.php/Devires.


O prazo para o envio dos textos é o dia 06 de março de 2017.


Coordenação do dossiê, Roberta Veiga (editor),

Ilana Feldman e Carla Italiano (convidadas).




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Call for Papers: BIANCO E NERO journal, n. 3/2017



Latin Lovers in Contemporary Italian Cinema

Edited by Enrico Biasin and Catherine O’Rawe

In March 1994 Silvio Berlusconi, then a businessman, was elected to the Italian parliament, becoming immediately Prime Minister (Ginsborg, Asquer 2011). The presence of the Mediaset boss at the apex of governmental power has been perhaps most widely discussed in terms of its carnivalesque aspects, and Berlusconi’s political persona has been most frequently understood as a contemporary variation of the Latin Lover archetype (Rodotà 2005). His tenure saw a series of tensions emerge, between Berlusconi as supporter of Family Days and as protagonist of the murky bunga bunga parties at his Arcore residence (cf. Travaglio, Gomez, Lillo 2009). Berlusconi removed distinctions between the public sphere and the domestic one, endangering his ‘bourgeois respectability’ (Mosse 1985, 1998), and compromising his gender identity in two major ways: firstly, by showcasing his sexual and emotional difficulties, he contributed to the ‘feminization’ of Italian popular culture. Secondly, by exaggerating his reputation as a lover, he contributed to the excessive ‘masculinization’ of the private sphere.

Bearing in mind this reshaping of the masculinity of one of the most high-profile figures of the Italian social scene of the last two decades, a similar process, activated by contemporary Italian popular film with regard to its male protagonists, can be noted. The reluctant spearhead of a national cinema ‘in transition’ (Zagarrio 2000), and marked by an endemic lack of a robust industrial structure (Zagarrio, 2006), popular production – in particular the lucrative filone of the cinepanettone (O’Leary 2013) – seems to illustrate one possible pitfall that Mediterranean virility encounters: ‘A machismo which denies even a suspicion of femininity in males [but that] often oscillates with festivals of male transvestism or with other manifestations of an insecure male identity’ (Gilmore 1982). In this way the emblematic figure of the Latin seducer – ‘a model of masculine identification so widely disseminated by the media as to become a cliché through which Italians and non-Italians understand one another’ (Malossi 1996) – undergoes a dynamic reconfiguration (cfr. Reich 2000; Reich 2006; O’Rawe 2014; Reich and O’Rawe 2015). The Latin Lover of contemporary Italian cinema battles ever-present threats to his phallic supremacy, and must engage in a bitter struggle against himself, as well as against hostile societal and cultural forces, giving rise to a ‘masquerade’, which, to paraphrase Joan Rivière (1986 [1929]), aims to conceal his femininity and to escape the repercussions that its discovery might bring.

This issue of BIANCO E NERO n. 3/2017 brings together articles that have as their focus the figure of the Latin Lover in Italian cinema since the 1980s. Without wishing to limit prospective analyses, some possible topics for exploration are:

- Textual representations of the Latin Lover. Ways in which films represent, parody, and rework the figure of the Latin Lover, drawing on acting styles from the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s (from Rossano Brazzi to Marcello Mastroianni, from Adriano Celentano to Jerry Calà, from Diego Abatantuomo to Guido Nicheli and Christian De Sica).

- Gender performance through a national lens. The notion of ‘male masquerade’ in relation to cultural features conventionally associated with the Latin Lover tradition, and to their function in disavowing the anxiety of the contemporary Italian male.

- Star performances. The construction of models of male stardom (Jerry Calà, Diego Abatantuomo, Andrea Roncato, Christian De Sica, Ezio Greggio, Massimo Ghini, Alessandro Siani, Raoul Bova) centred on the figure of the Latin Lover and on the negotiation of the industrial dynamics of cinematic, television and media production.

- Intermedial dimensions of the actor. The historical overlap through different media forms of acting styles associated with the Latin Lover character, with specific focus on the connections between cinema, television and variety shows. //

- Social, political and class dimensions. The possibile relationship between the figure of the Latin Lover as constructed by cinema, and political, social and class-based discourses – see, for example, Renato Vallanzasca/Kim Rossi Stuart in “Vallanzasca: Angels of Evil” (2010) by Michele Placido.

- Gossip, magazines, paratexts//as venues for the articulation of socio-cultural discourses around the Latin Lover, focused on the permeability between private and public, and fuelled by digital gossip sites and tabloid journalism (“Chi”, “Gente», “Novella 2000”, “Eva 3000”, “Grand Hotel”, “Vip”, “DiTutto”).

- Fans, memorabilia, collecting. Items and products (such as diaries or informal writing, tertiary texts, fan scrapbooks, digital remediations etc.) that testify to spectators’ authentic engagement with the figure of the Latin Lover and his media representation.

Bibliography

David D. Gilmore, Anthropology of the Mediterranean Area, “Annual Review of Anthropology”, vol. 11, n. 11, 1982, pp. 175-205.

Paul Ginsborg, Enrica Asquer (eds.), Berlusconismo. Analisi di un sistema di potere, Laterza, Rome-Bari 2011.

Giannino Malossi (ed.), Latin Lover. A sud della passione, Charta, Milan 1996.

George L. Mosse, The Image of Man: The Creation of Modern Masculinity, Oxford University Press, New York 1998.

George L. Mosse, Nationalism and Sexuality: Respectability and Abnormal Sexuality in Modern Europe, Howard Fertig, New York 1985.

Alan O’Leary, Fenomenologia del cinepanettone, Rubettino, Soveria Mannelli 2013.

Catherine O’Rawe, Stars and Masculinities in Contemporary Italian Cinema, Palgrave MacMillan, London 2014.

Jacqueline Reich, Undressing the Latin Lover: Marcello Mastroianni, Fashion, and La dolce vita, in Stella Bruzzi, Pamela Church Gibson (eds.), Fashion Culture, Routledge, London 2000, pp. 209-220.

Jacqueline Reich, Beyond the Latin Lover: Marcello Mastroianni, Masculinity, and Italian Cinema, Indiana University Press, Bloomingtom-Indianapolis 2006.

Jacqueline Reich, Catherine O’Rawe, Divi. La mascolinità nel cinema italiano, Donzelli/Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia – Cineteca Nazionale, Rome 2015.

Joan Riviere, Womanliness as a Masquerade, in Victor Burgin, James Donald, Cora Kaplan (eds.), Formations of Fantasy, Methuen, London 1986, pp. 35-44.

Maria Laura Rodotà, La finnica e l’ultimo latin lover, “Corriere della Sera”, 23 giugno 2005, http://www.corriere.it/Primo_Piano/Esteri/2005/06_Giugno/23/gaffe.shtml.

Marco Travaglio, Peter Gomez, Marco Lillo, Papi. Uno scandalo politico, Chiarelettere, Milan 2009.

Vito Zagarrio (ed.), Il cinema della transizione. Scenari italiani degli anni Novanta, Marsilio, Venice 2000.

Vito Zagarrio (ed.), La meglio gioventù. Nuovo cinema italiano 2000-2006, Marsilio, Venice 2006.

Proposals – consisting of a brief abstract (no more than 200 words), five keywords and a concise author biography – should be sent by 28 February 2017 to the following email addresses: <biancoenero@fondazionecsc.it <mailto:biancoenero@fondazionecsc.it>>; <e.biasin@libero.it<mailto:e.biasin@libero.it>>; <c.g.orawe@bristol.ac.uk <mailto:c.g.orawe@bristol.ac.uk>>. 

Once the proposal has been approved, the deadline for the complete essay will be 31 May 2017. The issue will be published on December 2017. Articles should be between 20,000 and 25,000 characters, and they will undergo a double blind peer review.


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Call for Papers: Latin Lovers in Contemporary Italian Cinema "Bianco e Nero" 3/2017



Call for Papers «Bianco e Nero» 3/2017
Latin Lovers in Contemporary Italian Cinema
Edited by Enrico Biasin and Catherine O’Rawe

In March 1994 Silvio Berlusconi, then a businessman, was elected to the Italian parliament, becoming immediately Prime Minister (Ginsborg, Asquer 2011). The presence of the Mediaset boss at the apex of governmental power has been perhaps most widely discussed in terms of its carnivalesque aspects, and Berlusconi’s political persona has been most frequently understood as a contemporary variation of the Latin Lover archetype (Rodotà 2005). His tenure saw a series of tensions emerge, between Berlusconi as supporter of Family Days and as protagonist of the murky bunga bunga parties at his Arcore residence (cf. Travaglio, Gomez, Lillo 2009). Berlusconi removed distinctions between the public sphere and the domestic one, endangering his ‘bourgeois respectability’ (Mosse 1985, 1998), and compromising his gender identity in two major ways: firstly, by showcasing his sexual and emotional difficulties, he contributed to the ‘feminization’ of Italian popular culture. Secondly, by exaggerating his reputation as a lover, he contributed to the excessive ‘masculinization’ of the private sphere.

Bearing in mind this reshaping of the masculinity of one of the most high-profile figures of the Italian social scene of the last two decades, a similar process, activated by contemporary Italian popular film with regard to its male protagonists, can be noted. The reluctant spearhead of a national cinema ‘in transition’ (Zagarrio 2000), and marked by an endemic lack of a robust industrial structure (Zagarrio, 2006), popular production – in particular the lucrative filone of the cinepanettone (O’Leary 2013) – seems to illustrate one possible pitfall that Mediterranean virility encounters: ‘A machismo which denies even a suspicion of femininity in males [but that] often oscillates with festivals of male transvestism or with other manifestations of an insecure male identity’ (Gilmore 1982). In this way the emblematic figure of the Latin seducer – ‘a model of masculine identification so widely disseminated by the media as to become a cliché through which Italians and non-Italians understand one another’ (Malossi 1996) – undergoes a dynamic reconfiguration (cfr. Reich 2000; Reich 2006; O’Rawe 2014; Reich and O’Rawe 2015). The Latin Lover of contemporary Italian cinema battles ever-present threats to his phallic supremacy, and must engage in a bitter struggle against himself, as well as against hostile societal and cultural forces, giving rise to a masquerade, which, to paraphrase Joan Rivière (1986 [1929]), aims to conceal his femininity and to escape the repercussions that its discovery might bring.

This issue of «Bianco e Nero» 3/2017 brings together articles that have as their focus the figure of the Latin Lover in Italian cinema since the 1980s. Without wishing to limit prospective analyses, some possible topics for exploration are:

· Textual representations of the Latin Lover: ways in which films represent, parody, and rework the figure of the Latin Lover, drawing on acting styles from the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s (from Rossano Brazzi to Marcello Mastroianni, from Adriano Celentano to Jerry Calà, from Diego Abatantuomo to Guido Nicheli and Christian De Sica).
· Gender performance through a national lens: the notion of ‘male masquerade’ in relation to cultural features conventionally associated with the Latin Lover tradition, and to their function in disavowing the anxiety of the contemporary Italian male.
· Star performances: the construction of models of male stardom (Jerry Calà, Diego Abatantuomo, Andrea Roncato, Christian De Sica, Ezio Greggio, Massimo Ghini, Alessandro Siani, Raoul Bova) centred on the figure of the Latin Lover and on the negotiation of the industrial dynamics of cinematic, television and media production.
· Intermedial dimensions of the actor: the historical overlap through different media forms of acting styles associated with the Latin Lover character, with specific focus on the connections between cinema, television and variety shows.
· Social, political and class dimensions: the possibile relationship between the figure of the Latin Lover as constructed by cinema, and political, social and class-based discourses – see, for example, Renato Vallanzasca/Kim Rossi Stuart in Vallanzasca: Angels of Evil (2010) by Michele Placido.
· Gossip, magazines, paratexts as venues for the articulation of socio-cultural discourses around the Latin Lover, focused on the permeability between private and public, and fuelled by digital gossip sites and tabloid journalism («Chi», «Gente», «Novella 2000», «Eva 3000», «Grand Hotel», «Vip», «DiTutto»).
· Fans, memorabilia, collecting: items and products (such as diaries or informal writing, tertiary texts, fan scrapbooks, digital remediations etc.) that testify to spectators’ authentic engagement with the figure of the Latin Lover and his media representation.

Bibliography

David D. Gilmore, Anthropology of the Mediterranean Area, «Annual Review of Anthropology», vol. 11, n. 11, 1982, pp. 175-205.

Paul Ginsborg, Enrica Asquer (eds.), Berlusconismo. Analisi di un sistema di potere, Laterza, Rome-Bari 2011.

Giannino Malossi (ed.), Latin Lover. A sud della passione, Charta, Milan 1996.

George L. Mosse, The Image of Man: The Creation of Modern Masculinity, Oxford University Press, New York 1998.

George L. Mosse, Nationalism and Sexuality: Respectability and Abnormal Sexuality in Modern Europe, Howard Fertig, New York 1985.

Alan O’Leary, Fenomenologia del cinepanettone, Rubettino, Soveria Mannelli 2013.

Catherine O’Rawe, Stars and Masculinities in Contemporary Italian Cinema, Palgrave MacMillan, London 2014.

Jacqueline Reich, Undressing the Latin Lover: Marcello Mastroianni, Fashion, and La dolce vita, in Stella Bruzzi, Pamela Church Gibson (eds.), Fashion Culture, Routledge, London 2000, pp. 209-220.

Jacqueline Reich, Beyond the Latin Lover: Marcello Mastroianni, Masculinity, and Italian Cinema, Indiana University Press, Bloomingtom-Indianapolis 2006.

Jacqueline Reich, Catherine O’Rawe, Divi. La mascolinità nel cinema italiano, Donzelli/Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia – Cineteca Nazionale, Rome 2015.

Joan Riviere, Womanliness as a Masquerade, in Victor Burgin, James Donald, Cora Kaplan (eds.), Formations of Fantasy, Methuen, London 1986, pp. 35-44.

Maria Laura Rodotà, La finnica e l’ultimo latin lover, «Corriere della Sera», 23 giugno 2005, http://www.corriere.it/Primo_Piano/Esteri/2005/06_Giugno/23/gaffe.shtml.

Marco Travaglio, Peter Gomez, Marco Lillo, Papi. Uno scandalo politico, Chiarelettere, Milan 2009.

Vito Zagarrio (ed.), Il cinema della transizione. Scenari italiani degli anni Novanta, Marsilio, Venice 2000.

Vito Zagarrio (ed.), La meglio gioventù. Nuovo cinema italiano 2000-2006, Marsilio, Venice 2006.

Proposals – consisting of a brief abstract (no more than 200 words), five keywords and a concise author biography – should be sent by 28 February 2017 to the following email addresses: biancoenero@fondazionecsc.it; e.biasin@libero.it; c.g.orawe@bristol.ac.uk. Once the proposal has been approved, the deadline for the complete essay will be 31 May 2017. The issue will be published on December 2017. Articles should be between 20,000 and 25,000 characters, and they will undergo a double blind peer review.


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Nel 1994, l’imprenditore milanese Silvio Berlusconi viene eletto deputato della Repubblica italiana, ottenendo l’incarico di primo ministro (Ginsborg, Asquer 2011). La cornice istituzionale suggellata dalla presenza ai vertici del potere governativo nazionale dell’uomo numero uno di Mediaset possiede la sua controparte “carnevalesca” nello sfondo che inscrive la persona politica di Berlusconi all’interno dell’archetipo maschile del contemporaneo latin lover (Rodotà 2005), provocando così una serie di energiche tensioni tra il suo ruolo di promotore di Family Days e quello di “utilizzatore finale” nei bunga bunga semiclandestini ad Arcore (cfr. Travaglio, Gomez, Lillo 2009). Berlusconi non è riuscito così a distinguere la sfera pubblica da quella privata, mettendo fortemente a rischio la sua rispettabilità borghese (Mosse 1985, 1998), e quindi ponendo in crisi la propria identità di genere lungo due traiettorie: da un lato, mettendo in piazza le sue tribolazioni sessuali e affettive, ha “femminilizzato” lo spazio popolare; dall’altro, idealizzando iperbolicamente la propria fama di amatore, ha “mascolinizzato” eccessivamente l’ambiente privato.

Attraverso questo processo di rimodellamento della mascolinità di uno dei più noti attori della scena sociale italiana degli ultimi due decenni, è plausibile scorgere una non dissimile procedura messa in atto dalla coeva finzione cinematografica popolare autoctona nei riguardi di alcuni suoi personaggi maschili. Punta di diamante, suo malgrado, di un cinema nazionale “della ‘transizione’” (Zagarrio 2000) e connotato da un’endemica mancanza di struttura industriale (Zagarrio 2006), questa produzione – soprattutto quella facente capo al lucroso filone dei “cinepanettoni” (O’Leary 2013) – pare illustrare a tinte forti una delle possibili nemesi cui la virilità mediterranea può andare incontro: “un machismo che nega addirittura ogni sospetto di femminilità negli uomini [ma che] spesso interagisce con manifestazioni di travestitismo maschile o con altre dimostrazioni di una identità maschile insicura” (Gilmore 1982). Così, l’emblematica figura del seduttore latino – “modello di identificazione maschile così diffuso nella produzione mediatica da diventare cliché attraverso il quale italiani e stranieri si guardano reciprocamente” (Malossi 1996) – subisce un trattamento di riconfigurazione performativa (cfr. Reich 2000; Reich 2006; O’Rawe 2014; Reich e O’Rawe 2015). Alle prese con la minaccia latente di vedersi usurpato lo scettro della propria distinzione fallica, il latin lover dell’odierno cinema italico ingaggia una dura lotta tanto con se stesso quanto con le forze contestuali avverse, dando vita a una mascherata con l’intento, parafrasando Joan Riviere (1986 [1929]), sia di nascondere il possesso della femminilità sia di evitare le rappresaglie che potrebbe aspettarsi se fosse trovato in sua proprietà.

Il fascicolo 3/2017 di «Bianco e Nero» si pone l’obiettivo di raccogliere una serie di interventi che abbiano quale centro d’interesse analitico la figura del latin lover ritratta dal cinema italiano a partire dagli anni Ottanta. Senza voler porre un limite al lavoro esegetico, alcuni spunti per la ricerca potrebbero essere i seguenti:

· Performance testuali. Modelli testuali di raffigurazione, di parodizzazione e di trasfigurazione della rappresentazione del latin lover, con riferimento alla tradizione cinematografica attoriale degli Sessanta, Settanta e Ottanta (da Rossano Brazzi a Marcello Mastroianni, da Adriano Celentano a Jerry Calà, da Diego Abatantuono a Guido Nicheli, fino a Christian De Sica).
· Performance nazionali e di genere. La nozione di “mascherata maschile” in rapporto all’accentuazione degli elementi culturalmente associati alla tradizione del latin lover e al loro impiego per dissimulare l’ansia del soggetto maschile italiano contemporaneo.
· Performance divistiche. La costruzione di modelli divistici maschili (Jerry Calà, Diego Abatantuono, Andrea Roncato, Christian De Sica, Ezio Greggio, Massimo Ghini, Alessandro Siani, Raoul Bova) incentrati sul personaggio del latin lover e sulle dinamiche di negoziazione industriale afferenti alla produzione audiovisiva.
· Traiettorie attoriali intermediali. Il passaggio – tanto diacronico quanto sincronico – da un medium all’altro di forme di recitazione plasmate sul modello dell’amante latino, con particolare attenzione ai processi di connessione fra cinema, televisione e varietà d’intrattenimento popolare.
· Società, politica e classi sociali. La possibilità che il personaggio del latin lover costruito dalla comunicazione cinematografica sia associato al discorso politico, di classe e di opportunità sociali – si veda il caso di Renato Vallanzasca/Kim Rossi Stuart in Vallanzasca – Gli angeli del male (2010) di Michele Placido.
· Gossip, rotocalchi, paratestualità. Forme di articolazione del discorso culturale e sociale relativo al costume del latin lover, focalizzate sulla permeabilità tra privato e pubblico e alimentate dal pettegolezzo digitale e della pubblicistica scandalistica («Chi», «Gente», «Novella 2000», «Eva 3000», «Grand Hotel», «Vip», «DiTutto» ecc.).
· Fan, memorabilia, vintage. Prodotti di autenticazione della passione e affezione spettatoriali (archivi di scrittura popolare, tertiary texts, album di fan, rielaborazioni digitali ecc.) nei riguardi dell’odierna figura del seduttore latino e della sua rappresentazione mediale.


Bibliografia

David D. Gilmore, Anthropology of the Mediterranean Area, «Annual Review of Anthropology», vol. 11, n. 11, 1982, pp. 175-205.

Paul Ginsborg, Enrica Asquer (a cura di), Berlusconismo. Analisi di un sistema di potere, Laterza, Roma-Bari 2011.

Giannino Malossi (a cura di), Latin Lover. A sud della passione, Charta, Milano 1996.

George L. Mosse, The Image of Man: The Creation of Modern Masculinity, Oxford University Press, New York 1998.

George L. Mosse, Nationalism and Sexuality: Respectability and Abnormal Sexuality in Modern Europe, Howard Fertig, New York 1985.

Alan O’Leary, Fenomenologia del cinepanettone, Rubettino, Soveria Mannelli 2013.

Catherine O’Rawe, Stars and Masculinities in Contemporary Italian Cinema, Palgrave MacMillan, Londra 2014.

Maria Laura Rodotà, La finnica e l’ultimo latin lover, «Corriere della Sera», 23 giugno 2005, http://www.corriere.it/Primo_Piano/Esteri/2005/06_Giugno/23/gaffe.shtml.

Jacqueline Reich, Undressing the Latin Lover: Marcello Mastroianni, Fashion, and La dolce vita, in Stella Bruzzi, Pamela Church Gibson (a cura di), Fashion Culture, Routledge, Londra 2000, pp. 209-220.

Jacqueline Reich, Beyond the Latin Lover: Marcello Mastroianni, Masculinity, and Italian Cinema, Indiana University Press, Bloomingtom-Indianapolis 2006.

Jacqueline Reich, Catherine O’Rawe, Divi. La mascolinità nel cinema italiano, Donzelli/Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia – Cineteca Nazionale, Roma 2015.

Joan Riviere, Womanliness as a Masquerade, in Victor Burgin, James Donald, Cora Kaplan (a cura di), Formations of Fantasy, Methuen, Londra 1986, pp. 35-44.

Marco Travaglio, Peter Gomez, Marco Lillo, Papi. Uno scandalo politico, Chiarelettere, Milano 2009.

Vito Zagarrio (a cura di), Il cinema della transizione. Scenari italiani degli anni Novanta, Marsilio, Venezia 2000.

Vito Zagarrio (a cura di), La meglio gioventù. Nuovo cinema italiano 2000-2006, Marsilio, Venezia 2006.

Le proposte – contenti un breve abstract (non più di 200 parole), cinque parole-chiave e una sintetica biografia della/del proponente – dovranno essere inviate entro il 28 febbraio 2017 alle seguenti caselle di posta elettronica: biancoenero@fondazionecsc.it; e.biasin@libero.it; c.g.orawe@bristol.ac.uk. Se la proposta verrà approvata, il saggio, nella sua redazione finale, dovrà essere fornito entro il 31 maggio 2017. Il fascicolo della rivista sarà pubblicato nel mese di dicembre 2017. Gli articoli – la cui lunghezza dovrà essere compresa tra le 20.000 e le 25.000 battute – saranno sottoposti a procedura di double blind peer review.
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CFP: Latin American Women’s Filmmaking


CALL FOR PAPERS
Latin American Women’s Filmmaking


Senate House, University of London, 18^th September 2017

Forming part of the programme of events organised by the *Centro de Estudios La Mujer en la Historia de América Latina*, hosted by the *Institute of Modern Languages Research* and the *Institute of Latin American Studies* (University of London), and with the participation of the *Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies* (Birkbeck, University of London), we are pleased to announce the call for papers for the conference ‘*Latin American Women’s Filmmaking*’ which aims to contribute to the ongoing project of reviewing and rewriting Latin American film history and theory with women directors placed centre stage.

Latin American filmic production has rightly held a celebrated place in the global cinematic canon with many key filmmakers and theorists receiving significant scholarly and public attention. Traditionally, however, the vast majority of these acclaimed practitioners have been men. While recent years have witnessed an increase in the international popularity of notable directors such as Lucrecia Martel, Anna Muylaert, and Claudia Llosa, and in studies of women’s filmmaking in Latin America, much work remains to be done. Women have played a crucial role in the region’s rich cinematic history, yet many female artists have yet to be included in the overarching narrative of Latin American cinema history. Moreover, their contribution to the politics and aesthetics of the region’s filmic landscape has not been fully recognised or analysed. Indeed, the new critical methodologies required to examine these contributions are still under construction. This conference seeks to address each of these concerns.

The conference will bring together researchers interested in the filmic narratives and cinematic processes created and conducted by women in Latin America in order to analyse the contributions they have made to the region’s cinematic history.**Possible topics include (but are not limited to):

* New Interpretations of cinematic works made by women in Latin America;
* Latin American women Film Directors, Collectives, Producers and
below-the-line staff;
* Individual or collective social and political engagement in women’s
filmmaking;
* The expansion of the ‘political’ through engagement with the
personal, the domestic and private in Latin American women’s filmmaking;
* The role and significance of new technologies and formats (such as
video and digital) in increasing women's participation in Latin
American filmmaking;
* Popular education through film and alternative dissemination
projects led by women;
* Latin American women filmmakers in exile (political or economic);
* Women filmmakers’ transnational strategies of funding, distribution,
and exhibition;
* Sexual division of work within cinematic production and attempts to
redress imbalances.

Keynote Speakers:

* Dr Deborah Shaw (University of Portsmouth) and Dr Deborah
Martin (UCL), editors of the forthcoming volume /Latin American
Women Filmmakers: Production, Politics, Poetics /to be published
with I. B. Tauris and launched during the conference.

* Professor Lucia Nagib (University of Reading), author of /The New
Brazilian Cinema/ (2003) and /Brazil on Screen: Cinema Novo, New
Cinema, Utopia/(2007).

Titles of proposed papers, institutional affiliations, and short abstracts of 100 words should be emailed to the conference organisers at the addresslatamwomendirectors@gmail.com <mailto:latamwomendirectors@gmail.comBY 20^th FEBRUARY 2017.


http://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/ <http://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/>║ http://ilas.sas.ac.uk/║ http://www.cemhal.org/║ http://www.bbk.ac.uk/cilavs/<http://www.bbk.ac.uk/cilavs/>

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Quintin Hogg Trust PhD scholarships in media and communication studies/art & design at the University of Westminster



Quintin Hogg Trust PhD scholarships
University of Westminster

Application deadline: Feb 10, 2017, 5pm
Quintin Hogg Trust PhD scholarships in a) media and communication research and b) art & design

The University of Westminster Graduate School is pleased to announce a total of 22 new MPhil/PhD scholarships in support of high-quality, innovative early career research.

Applications are now invited from eligible candidates for a number of these scholarships within the Westminster School of Media, Arts and Design, to commence in September 2017 on a full-time basis for three years.

The scholarships fund an annual tax-free stipend of £16,000 plus payment of full tuition fees for Home/EU or Overseas candidates.

Combining world-leading research and innovation with practice-led engagement and impact, the School provides a vibrant global research environment in a purpose-built campus in Harrow, within easy reach of central London.

Aiming to develop, in particular, research that is internationally recognised and contributes to innovative practice and public engagement, the scholarships will be available to those submitting proposals which fall within the remit of the following research institutes:

Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI):
One of the leading research groups in media and communication with a wide and expanding range of research interests, focusing on research areas such as digital/social media, global media, media policy, political economy of the media, media history, creativity, media industries and economy, cultural policy, critical theory, media philosophy.

Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM):
The UK’s leading centre for research in art and design, and a leading provider of both practice-based and theoretical PhD research in photography, film, digital media, ceramics, visual art, fashion, art-science relationships and moving image work.

More information:
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AVN722/quintin-hogg-trust-phd-scholarships/

https://www.westminster.ac.uk/courses/research-degrees/research-areas/media-arts-and-design/how-to-apply

Application details:

Media & Communication Research:
https://www.westminster.ac.uk/courses/research-degrees/quintin-hogg-trust-scholarship-in-media-and-communication

Art & Design:
https://www.westminster.ac.uk/courses/research-degrees/quintin-hogg-trust-scholarship-in-the-centre-for-research-and-education-in-arts-and-media-cream

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Film Lecturer position: Edinburgh Napier University


Edinburgh Napier are advertising for a full-time permanent post of Lecturer in Film (Ref 4577).

This post is offered as a full-time/part-time/jobshare.

https://applications2.napier.ac.uk/jobvac/Jobdetails.aspx?GUID=1F052E46-5679-4145-9D4A-65CA20F227F2

Lecturer – Film
Department
The School of Arts and Creative Industries
Job Type
Full Time
Contract Type
Permanent
Job Summary

​Lecturer in Film (1fte or part time/job share considered)

About Edinburgh Napier University
Edinburgh Napier University is home to forward-thinking people inspired by the world around them. We create and support personalised learning and research opportunities that develop talent and solutions that really work and matter in today’s and tomorrow’s world.

Edinburgh Napier is a truly international University with over 18,000 students from 110 countries. As one of Scotland’s top universities for graduate employability with 95.2% (HESA 2014), this is our testament of commitment to teaching and research. We have ambitious plans to grow in size, shape and further strengthen our academic reputation.

About the School

The School of Arts and Creative Industries has well-established programmes in Design, Photography and Advertising, English and Acting, Music, Journalism and Publishing, and in Film and Television. On our practice-based BA (Hons) Film programme, students make films and study the art and craft of cinema, developing skills in specialist filmmaking roles.

We teach to a high technical standard across script writing, production, directing, documentary filmmaking, cinematography, editing, and sound design. There are fully equipped facilities including HD video cameras, film lighting, Avid Media Composer edit suites, Pro Tools and a sound dubbing theatre. Students have opportunities for work experience placements with industry. Screen Academy Scotland (our partnership with Edinburgh College of Art) is one of three Creative Skillset Film Academies in the UK and is the home of our post-graduate Film courses.

The School is committed to strengthening its undergraduate and postgraduate programmes, and research portfolio.

About the role

You will be responsible for developing, designing and delivering teaching and student centred learning underpinned by academic scholarship and professional practice, within the Film Programmes.

You will produce module content and teaching plans, prepare lectures, lead tutorials and seminars and carry out associated programme and module administration. You will provide specialist teaching required for camera operation and lighting, and/or sound recording and post-production. You will also contribute to teaching which will give students an understanding of the changing technologies and developing business environment for film production.

You will also be required to conduct individual and collaborative research projects, contribute to the research profile within your School, leading to the production of high quality research outputs/outcomes.

You will contribute to the University’s objective of growing our academic reputation for research-informed student learning.

You must be ambitious and enthusiastic about cross-disciplinary working and be committed to working collaboratively across the University. You will be required to work independently and as part of a team, supporting others.

You will have excellent communication skills and effective interpersonal skills with the ability to listen, engage and inspire others.

We welcome applications from candidates on a part time or job share basis.

About you

You must have:
· Qualification in relevant discipline at least to undergraduate level
· A doctoral level qualification in a relevant discipline or relevant, equivalent experience in professional practice.
· Evidence of a professional academic and research / professional practitioner profile, with experience relevant to film drama, alongside a commitment to sustained, continuous professional/academic development.
· In-depth knowledge of filmmaking, together with an understanding of contemporary contexts for the industry, alongside practical experience as a filmmaker with an appropriate area of specialism in the areas of cinematography and/or sound production for film drama.
· Sufficient breadth and depth of experience in the craft of professional filmmaking, which should include specialist knowledge of camera and/or sound, in order to develop high quality teaching/learning and research programmes
· Experience of research-led teaching and/or training.
· Demonstrable evidence of a teaching specialisation in order to deliver up-to-date practice-based modules.
· Evidence of a relevant network of film industry contacts.

Edinburgh Napier University is committed to supporting equality in the workplace and encourages diversity. We currently hold a bronze Athena SWAN institutional award.



Date Added
2016-11-18 00:00:00
Vacancy Ref
4577/2/MC
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CfP NECS 2017: Conference Paris "Sensibility and the Senses: Media, Bodies, Practices"


CALL FOR PAPERS

The NECS 2017 Conference

SENSIBILITY AND THE SENSES

Media, Bodies, Practices

Paris, France

29 June to 01 July 2017

Hosted by the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3

Pre-Conference

27 and 28 June 2017

Hosted by the Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7

Keynote presentations

Centre Pompidou

Grand Amphithéâtre de la Sorbonne

Deadline for submissions: 31 January 2017

Please note that the membership fee must be paid before submission (see www.necs.org/faq for more details). Pay the fee in January to get access for the full calendar year.

The question of the relationship between media, bodies, and the senses cuts across the entire history of media theories. Since their first appearance, technical media such as telegraphy, photography, gramophone, film, typewriter, the telephone, radio, and then television, computer, internet, as well as a wide variety of cultural techniques for the recording, processing, and transmitting of information have been analyzed taking into consideration their relationships with the human body and its sensory organs. Concepts such as “organ projection,” “prosthesis,” “innervation,” “extension,” and “interface” have been used to describe the contact and the interaction between human organisms and technical apparatuses with their various degrees of hybridization, which in turn have generated a whole series of utopian and dystopian visions of a future “post-human” condition. And while the very notion of medium is strictly related to the problem of sensory perception (since it finds one of its origins in the Latin translation of a Greek term, metaxy, which was used by Aristotle in order to indicate the material intermediary entities that make perception possible), the body itself (with its expressive face, its sensitive skin, and its meaningful gestures and movements) has often been considered a sort of primary medium, a crucial reference point in order to understand the very nature of mediation.

The current transformations in our media landscape raise once more the question of the correlation between the history of technology and the history of the human sensorium, and invite us to reconsider the various possible relationships between media – in the widest sense of the term – and the realm of the senses, affects, and emotions. Cinema, with the various historical transformations of its spatial dispositif, has provided for decades and continues to provide a particularly important field for the interpretation of the cultural dynamics involved in the representation and reception of bodily identities and for the analysis of the aesthetic, embodied experience of the spectator. The same can be said for other visual, audiovisual, and sound media, which have tried to render through the grains, textures, and frequencies of their representations the different, dynamic materialities of bodies and sensations.

Today, the new bio-technical forms of life produced by ubiquitous digital media and by a whole range of artistic and non-artistic practices confront us with unprecedented theoretical questions, which can be tackled by combining perspectives that are both archaeological and forward-looking. We need appropriate theoretical frameworks in order to understand phenomena such as the sensory and cognitive functions performed by contemporary networked screens, the return of stereoscopic 3D imagery, the recent developments in the fields of virtual and augmented reality, the increasing presence in our living environment of intelligent sensing devices, the agencies of elemental media and mediating matters, as well as our daily interactions with digital technologies whose computational processes and outcomes are located below or beyond the thresholds of human perception. Understanding the new conditions of human and non-human sensibility within a fully networked media environment is one of the major challenges of contemporary film and media studies.

The 2017 NECS conference – which will take place for the first time France, in a cultural context which has given a very important contribution to the development and the institutionalization of film and media studies – will try to meet this challenge by tackling the crucial issue of the relationship between media, bodies, and the senses through the different research perspectives pursued by the members of our community.

Submissions may include but are not limited to the following topics:

·the different ways in which the relationship between media, bodies, and the senses has been discussed in the history of film and media theories

·the possible correlations between the history of visual, audiovisual, and sound technologies, and the history of sensory experience

·the human body as medium

·the nature of embodied media experiences: the perspectives of philosophy, psychology, and the neurosciences

·media environments, sensitive landscapes, mediating matters

·audiovisual media and the aesthetics/economies/ecologies of attention and distraction

·the history and the current transformation of screens, and their relation to human sensory experience

·audience bodies: apparatuses, behaviors, and the senses

·the media experiences produced by 3D imaging and by virtual and augmented reality devices

·media/body interfaces

·bodily gestures and motion capture technologies

·the history and current developments of techniques of brain and body imaging, biometrics, and body data visualization

·the impact of media and technologies of big data processing onto the forms and rhythms of human sensory perception

·wearable media and smart tissues

·the role of media in mobilizing and geolocalizing bodies

·organic bodies, artificial bodies, hybrid bodies, prosthetic bodies

·the relation between human and non-human (material, environmental, animal, technological) sensibility

·the representation of bodies and the senses in the history of sound media

·bodies and the senses in the history of experimental, avant-garde cinema and in contemporary visual arts

·the aesthetics of film forms and the relationships between filmic and bodily energies and forces

·bodies and the senses in the traditions of documentary cinema

·bodies and the senses in visual anthropology and sensorial ethnography

·bodies, senses, and modes of self-representation in social media

·bodies and the senses in videogames and animation films

·bodies, gestures, discipline, and performance in the history of industrial cinema

·media, sensibility, affects, and emotions

·audiovisual media and the politics of sexuality and body identities

·media and the politics of the senses

·stars and celebrities as bodies, images, and role models

·bodies, senses, and fan cultures

·the impact of new and domestic media on identities, intimacies, gender roles, and personal relationships

·representations of bodies and the senses and questions of ethics, morality, and taste

Scholars from all areas of cinema and media studies, whether previously affiliated with NECS or new to the network, are invited to submit proposals, but NECS membership is a requirement.

NB The conference will be held in English, with a limited presence of contributions in French. Individual papers will have to be in English. Pre-constituted panels can be in English, in French, or with a mix of the two languages.

FORMATS

Individual papers

Individual presenters wishing to submit a proposal for a paper presentation of max. 20 minutes are required to provide their name, email address, the title of the paper, an abstract, key biographical references, and a short bio of the speaker.

Pre-constituted panels

We support the submission of proposals for pre-constituted panels with 3 or 4 papers (3 papers only if there is a respondent) in order to strengthen the thematic coherence of panels. Furthermore, several thematically related panels may form larger clusters. We would like to strongly encourage members of the NECS workgroups to put together pre-constituted panels, but we also welcome submissions from academic research project teams, museums, archives, and other institutions. We highly recommend no more than two speakers from the same institution with a maximum of 20 minutes speaking time each. Panel organizers are asked to submit panel proposals that include a panel title, a short description of the panel and information on all of the individual papers of the panel, as described above.

Workshops

Events such as workshops, roundtables or seminars – both pre-conference and conference – concentrating on more practical aspects of our field, e.g. teaching, research methods, publishing, or networking with the media industry are also welcome. Speaking time should be limited to 10 minutes per participant. Organizers are asked to submit workshop proposals that include a title and a short description.

Workgroups

There will be opportunity for the NECS workgroups to meet during the conference. Please notify the conference organizers if you wish to held a workgroup meeting in Paris: necs2017paris@gmail.com

Please note that individuals may submit only one paper proposal, either as individual presenters or as part of a pre-constituted panel or workshop. Please submit all proposals before 31 January 2017 using the submission form available at: http://necs.org/conference/proposal-submission-form/

ACCOMPANYING EVENTS

The NECS Graduate Workshop

The NECS Graduate Workshop has been designed to give scholars at the beginning of their career a platform for networking with established European film and media scholars. The 15th NECS Graduate Workshop in Paris (27-28 June 2017, Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7) is dedicated to the topic of Future Sensibilities: Mediations of Precarious Life. You will find the CfP online at: http://necs.org/conference/callforpapers2017/cfp_gw2017/ Please send your submission with an abstract (max. 200 words) and a short bio (max. 150 words) to: graduates@necs.org

Pre-Conference workshops and activities

Will be hosted by the Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7 on 27-28 June 2017. A full program will be available together with the Conference program. There is no conference fee, but valid NECS membership and online registration are required in order to participate in the conference and to submit a proposal. Participants (individual presenters as well as all members of pre-constituted panels) must register and pay their membership fee before a proposal is submitted (http://necs.org/user/register ). Since bank transfers may take some time, please consider transferring the membership fee before January 23rd, 2017.

Participants will have to cover their own travel and accommodation expenses. Travel information, a list of local hotels and information on further events will be posted on the NECS conference website in Spring 2017.

See also: http://necs.org/faq.

Please email all inquiries to: necs2017paris@gmail.com

CONFERENCE ORGANIZERS

NECS Steering Committee: Sophie Einwächter, Judith Keilbach, Skadi Loist, Michał Pabiś-Orzeszyna, Francesco Pitassio, Antonio Somaini, Alena Strohmaier

NECS Conference Committee: Luca Barra, Ruggero Eugeni, Jesko Jockenhövel, Rahma Khazam, Daniel Kulle, Raphaëlle Moine, Michał Pabiś-Orzeszyna, Antonio Somaini

Local organizing team at the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3: Raphaëlle Moine and Antonio Somaini, together with Alexis Blanchet, Fabrice Buschini, Teresa Castro, Kristian Feigelson, Kira Kitsopanidou, Barbara Laborde, Bruno Péquignot

Local organizing team at the Université Paris Diderot Paris 7: Emmanuelle André and Martine Beugnet.
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The Liverpool Screen School seeks two individuals to join the Media Production team


The Liverpool Screen School seeks two highly motivated individuals to join the Media Production team, one with expertise and experience in Film/Television production and one with specialisms in Digital Media production.

The Liverpool Screen School, part of LJMU's Faculty of Arts, Professional and Social Studies, offers undergraduate programmes in Creative Writing, Drama, Film Studies, Journalism and Media Production, together with postgraduate courses in International Journalism, Writing and Screenwriting. The Media Production team currently comprises five members of staff with backgrounds in Television and New Media production. The department delivers the BA (Hons) Media Production degree, which aims to produce graduates who can deliver media, using cameras, lights, editing and software to tell stories both fact and fiction to be consumed on the Internet, televisions, mobiles, tablets and big screens. Media Production is a Creative Skillset accredited course.

The department is developing its strategic priorities in research, postgraduate provision (currently validating an MA in Documentary), internationalisation, public engagement and enterprise activity. Reporting to the Programme Leader, you will contribute to these developments, whilst also undertaking teaching and administrative duties across the Media Production portfolio. Current areas of industry practice / research interests in the department include: Television Drama, Factual Entertainment, Documentary, Interactive media, new approaches to narrative, 360 filming, participatory culture and multiplatform. The department is looking to expand its expertise in visual effects and interactive media.

Liverpool, the most filmed in city in the UK outside of London, is an excellent base to make and teach media, with media city in Salford nearby. The city boasts a vibrant culture and LJMU is proud of its many connections with local media and arts organisations, including The Everyman and Playhouse, The Unity Theatre, The Royal Court Theatre, The Liverpool Philharmonic, The Liverpool Tate, Lime Pictures, Liverpool Film Office, ITV and the BBC.

Informal enquiries may be made to Sarah Haynes, Head of Media Production at the Liverpool Screen School 0151 231 4770 (s.haynes@ljmu.ac.uk<mailto:r.mclean@ljmu.ac.uk>)

More details and application process are available online here: https://jobs.ljmu.ac.uk/intranet/wd_portal.list?p_web_site_id=4005&p_function=map&p_title=Current%20vacancies
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CFP: Women in Gothic and Horror Cinema
Gothic Feminism presents: Women-in-Peril or Final Girls? Representing Women in Gothic and Horror Cinema

25^th – 26^th May 2017

University of Kent

Keynote speaker: Dr Xavier Aldana Reyes (Manchester Metropolitan University)


CALL FOR PAPERS

The representation of female protagonists has been a central tenant in both Gothic and Horror cinema. In the Hollywood Gothic films of the 1940s, the heroine is the primary focus as she navigates key tropes of the genre, including the exploration of the old dark house and the investigating of sinister marital secrets. These melodramas and /noir /films, as they have also been called, re-work the Bluebeard story and establish a ‘woman-in-peril’ character archetype which features in films such as /Rebecca /(1940), /Gaslight/ (1944) and /Secret Beyond the Door/ (1947) (Waldman, 1983; Doane, 1987; Tartar, 2004). These Gothic conventions have been revived and reworked recently in contemporary cinema with the release of /Crimson Peak/ (2015).

Horror cinema has also been characterised by the portrayal of its female protagonists. The 1930s Universal horror films typically feature the endangered woman who is terrorised by the monster or villain. Indeed, as Rhona J. Berenstein notes, the image of a woman whose ‘mouth is open as if in midscream’ with ‘fear chiselled into her features’ is so familiar that one can argue it ‘succinctly signifies the American horror film’ (Berenstein, 1996, 1). Later permutations of the genre sustain this focus on gender representations, as with the transgressive qualities of ‘postmodern horror’ (Pinedo, 1997) or, more specifically, the ‘slasher’ film which focuses on the brutal murder of several victims at the hands of a serial killer, with particular attention paid to the killing and/or survival of female character(s). /Black Christmas /(1974), /The Texas Chainsaw Massacre / (1974) and /Halloween/ (1978) exemplify these conventions and theorists have observed the centrality of the horror heroine within this genre: Carol Clover’s seminal work on the topic highlights the importance of the ‘female victim-hero’ and the complex gender representations inherent in this figure when she becomes the film’s sole survivor or ‘Final Girl’ (Clover, 1992).

When comparing these historic representations of female protagonists in Gothic and horror cinema, one can identify many similarities between the two genres or modes in respect to their portrayal of women. In the examples above, Gothic and horror both privilege the depiction of the woman’s experience within a narrative arc which exposes her to a danger emanating from an initially unknown or misunderstood threat. This risk – which is normally made against her life – comes from the villain or antagonist conventionally gendered as male. This correlation between Gothic and horror could be argued to stem from their shared heritage: it has been noted how the horror genre ‘has its roots in the English gothic novels of the 18^th and 19^th centuries’ (Penner and Schneider, 2012). This lineage is further evident by the way the terms ‘Gothic’ and ‘horror’ have been applied interchangeably as delineating categories. Horror has been labelled as Gothic: both David Pirie and Jonathan Rigby write of the ‘English Gothic Cinema’ which includes Hammer’s films, whilst Bernice M. Murphy studies US horror from the perspective of ‘Rural Gothic’ (Pirie, 2008; Murphy, 2013; Rigby, 2015). And Gothic has been called horror: Mark Jancovich points out how the 1940s Hollywood Gothics were also understood as horror films at their time of release (Jancovich, 2013). Both Gothic and horror have also attracted considerable attention concerning their depiction of women and whether such texts are ‘feminist’ (see, for example, Pinedo, 1997; Freeland, 2000).

Yet there are also significant differences between Gothic and horror. The two modes or genres can be distinguished by variations in how the central female protagonist is depicted. The Gothics of the 1940s focus on the representation of the heroine within the intimidating space of the ancestral mansion, but the 1970’s slasher horrors emphasise the ‘Terrible Place’ (Clover, 1992) where extreme violence is executed. Where the Gothic emphasises suspicion, suspense and mystery, the horror film showcases blood, torture and gore. Berenstein notes how the contrast between Gothic and horror is also present in ‘classic horror’ – pre-dating the slasher – where ‘[unlike] the Gothic novel, however, heroines are not confronted by the men closest to them … Instead, women are attacked or seduced by foreign male (and, sometimes, female) fiends’ (Berenstein, 1996, 12). Gothic and horror also differ in their presumed target audience. The Gothic – an integral part of melodrama and the ‘woman’s picture’ – has traditionally been analysed in terms of the Female Gothic and its appeal to female audiences (Waldman, 1983; Doane, 1987; Modleski, 2008). Conversely, the spectatorship for horror has been characterised as adolescent and male (Williams, 1984; Clover, 1992; Creed, 1993).

This conference seeks to re-engage with these discussions of gender within Gothic and horror cinema by directly comparing the two. What relationship does Gothic have to horror – or horror to the Gothic – in respect to female representation? What makes a Gothic heroine different from (or, indeed, similar to) female victims/protagonists in horror films? What can we say about the centrality given to female performance in both these genres/modes? Where does one draw the line between Gothic and horror in film? 2017 will mark 30 years since Mary Ann Doane published /The Desire to Desire/ and 25 years since Carol Clover published /Men, Women and Chainsaws/. This conference will also reflect upon the impact of seminal works on Gothic, horror and gender such as these within film theory. What do these works tell us about the relationship between Gothic and horror in respect to female representation? How do theories of the ‘woman’s film’ and the ‘Final Girl’ relate to contemporary film theory and feminist criticism? Are these ideas still applicable to recent Gothic and horror films, and their heroines?

In addressing these questions this conference will underline the importance of female protagonists in Gothic and horror, within film history and contemporary cinema, and ask: are these characters women-in-peril or Final Girls, or both?

Topics can include but are not limited to:

- Comparisons between the genre conventions and tropes within Gothic and horror films and their representation of female protagonists

- Close textual analysis of a single film or series of films which blur the lines between Gothic and horror, or an analysis of film/s which reinforce the differences between the Gothic and horror traditions through the depiction of women characters

- The connection between the Gothic or horror heroine and other characters within the narrative, such as the love interest, male villain, other victims, etc.

- How the Gothic and horror heroine relate to archetypal roles, such as the victim, the mother or the monstrous-feminine

- Representations of space and how this impacts upon the portrayal of the Gothic or horror female characters

- Film theory and the distinction between Gothic and horror in cinema

- How Gothic and horror women characters engage with feminist discourse and theories of gender representation

- Female spectators of Gothic and horror and fandom

Please submit proposals of 500 words, along with a short biographical note (250 words) to gothicfeminism2016@gmail.com by 1^st February 2017.


Conference organisers: Frances A. Kamm and Tamar Jeffers McDonald

https://gothicfeminism.com/

https://twitter.com/GothicFeminism



This conference is the second annual event from the Gothic Feminism project, within the Melodrama Research Group in the Centre of Film and Media Research at the University of Kent. Gothic Feminism explores the representation of the Gothic heroine on-screen in her various incarnations.
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Call for registration: Sex and the cinema, a film studies conference


FINAL CALL FOR REGISTRATION – (registration ends 1 December)


Sex and the Cinema – A /Film Studies/ journal conference

10-11 December 2016

University of Kent


From the extremes of Disney canoodling at one end of the spectrum to pornography at the other, sex has always had a central role in moving images. This role has never been confined to representations in individual scenes, but has taken shape in every industrial and cultural aspect of their production, dissemination and consumption, from the Hollywood casting couch and red-light-district alleyways, to parked cars at drive-ins and the YouPorn user’s bedroom. So too has sex held a key position in film scholarship, aesthetics and the cognate disciplines that appraise moving images and their function in society. In recent years, this presence has only grown, in the form of key individual publications as well as burgeoning subfields (e.g., porn studies) and objects of inquiry (e.g., grindhouse programming).

As a substantial intervention into this ongoing research, the Aesthetics Research Centre, the Centre for Film and Media Research, and the journal /Film Studies/ will stage a major international conference at the University of Kent in Canterbury (UK), to be held 10-11 December 2016.

Keynote speakers:

•Prof. Daniel Biltereyst

•Prof. A.W Eaton

•Prof. Jon Lewis

•Jennifer Lyon Bell

The programme, which includes nearly 50 academics from the UK, Europe and beyond, is available at:

https://sexcinemaconference.wordpress.com/programme/

Registration (*ends 1 December*) is available at:

https://sexcinemaconference.wordpress.com/registration/


Dr Mattias Frey
Reader in Film
Managing Director, Centre for Film and Media Research
Director of Education, School of Arts
Co-Editor, /Film Studies/
University of Kent - Jarman School of Arts, 2-26 - Canterbury CT2 7UG - UK

NEW 2016: /Extreme Cinema: The Transgressive Rhetoric of Today's Art Film Culture/
https://www.rutgersuniversitypress.org/extreme-cinema/9780813576510

NEW 2016: /Film Studies/ 13 & 14 on 'Institutions and Agency'
http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/journals/film/

NEW IN PB 2016: /Cine-Ethics: Ethical Dimensions of Film Theory, Practice and Spectatorship/
https://www.routledge.com/Cine-Ethics-Ethical-Dimensions-of-Film-Theory-Practice-and-Spectatorship/Choi-Frey/p/book/9780415821254
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3 new Lectureships - Cardiff University, UK



We are very pleased to announce three new Lectureships in the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies here at Cardiff University.

Applications are welcomed from candidates with established expertise in media, communication or cultural studies, with the following areas being of particular interest for purposes of these three posts:

Global Media
Creative and Cultural Industries
Television Studies
Public Communication
Community Media

Salary: £40,523 - £46,924 per annum (Grade 7)
Closing date: Saturday, 3 December 2016

Post Reference Number: 5432BR
Further details:

https://krb-sjobs.brassring.com/TGWebHost/jobdetails.aspx?SID=%5eb21_slp_rhc_Wa9U2D7%2fHHyNV5dfHGpM8DZiIBY6FLHGvZT1s_slp_rhc_ENn_slp_rhc_GnK_slp_rhc_QcHEjXjtiIcgxp&jobId=988654&type=search&JobReqLang=140&recordstart=1&JobSiteId=5460&JobSiteInfo=988654_5460&GQId=3594

Thank you, and with best wishes
Stuart Allan

Stuart Allan
Professor and Head of School
School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies
Bute Building, King Edward VII Avenue
Cardiff University
Cardiff, CF10 3NB
UK

email: AllanS@cardiff.ac.uk

web: http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/journalism-media-cultural-studies
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CFP: Reality and screen, a postmodern mirror, IX International Conference on Communication and Reality



[Este mensaje sigue en castellano]

[Aquest missatge segueix en català]


Subject: CFP Reality and screen, a postmodern mirror, IX International Conference on Communication and Reality, Barcelona, 8 – 9 June, 2017. Blanquerna School of Communication and International Relations, Ramon Llull University

Deadline for abstract submission: 15th Decenber, 2016

Please pass this message on to your department and to colleagues who may be interested in our conference.


Dear Colleague,

We are pleased to announce that registration for the IX International Conference on Communication and Reality, entitled Reality and screen, a postmodern mirroris now in progress. The complete Call for Papers is posted in English, Spanish, and Catalan on our conference web site: http://cicr.blanquerna.edu/en/presentation <http://cicr.blanquerna.edu/en/presentation>.


We invite you*to submit individual abstracts and complete panel proposals <http://cicr.blanquerna.edu/?page_id=105&lang=en>*, and to peruse further information posted there.


In the last decade the screen has acquired a centrality that implies a cultural change and marks a tipping point in the massive process of digitalization. The screen itself is a singular phenomenon that deserves a specific and differentiated attention because it modifies the very nature of the information. Screen implies connection and, increasingly, interaction, both with information (e.g hypertext) and with people who produce it (e.g. social networks).The contemporary role of screen is not comparable to previous cultural changes, as those produced by Gunter’s printing press, photography or hertzian waves. Screen goes beyond, as it contains all formats: we read texts on a screen, we look at photos on a screen, we listen to the radio interacting with the screen of different devices, etc. The main feature of this transformation of the late postmodernity roots, thus, in the centrality and pervasiveness of the screen, which ceases to be a means to become a mediator.


For the 2017 edition, themedReality and screen, a postmodern mirror,we welcome scholars, practitioners, and students to provide new ideas and offer alternative, unorthodox, outside-the-box explorations of the issue, thus contributing to shaping the question of the role the screen is going to have in the cultural imaginary and cutlural practices of the future.

We look forward to hearing from you and receiving your comments at cicr@blanquerna.url.edu <mailto:cicr@blanquerna.url.edu>.

Sincerely,


The organizing Committee

Ferran Sáez, Ph.D.

Lluïsa Llamero, Ph.D.


Blanquerna School of Communication and International Relations

Universitat Ramon Llull

Pl. Joan Coromines, s/n

Barcelona

______________________________________________________

Asunto: Convocatoria Realidad y pantalla, un espejo postmoderno, IX Congreso Internacional Comunicación y Realidad, Barcelona, 8 y 9 de junio de 2017. Facultad de Comunicación y Relaciones Internacionales Blanquerna, Universidad Ramon Llull

Fecha límite para la recepción de resúmenes: 15 de diciembre de 2016.

Por favor hagan difusión de este mensaje en su departamento y entre sus colegas que puedan estar interesados en este congreso.


Apreciado/Apreciada,


La organización de la IX edición del Congreso Internacional de Comunicación y Realidad, que se celebrará los días 8 y 9 de junio de 2017 en la Facultad de Comunicación y Relaciones Internacionales Blanquerna-URL de Barcelona con el título Realidad y pantalla, un espejo postmoderno, le comunica que ya está abierto el plazo para enviar las propuestas de comunicación o de panel mediante la web del Congreso: http://cicr.blanquerna.edu/es/presentacion/ <http://cicr.blanquerna.edu/es/presentacion/>.Asimismo encontrará, entre otras primeras informaciones, la convocatoria o call for papers.


La centralidad que ha adquirido la pantalla en la última década implica un cambio cultural de carácter cualitativo, y marca un punto de inflexión en el proceso masivo y generalizado de digitalización. La pantalla en sí misma es un fenómeno que merece una atención diferenciada y específica ya que modifica la misma naturaleza de la información. La pantalla implica conexión y cada vez más, también interacción, sea con la información (hipertexto) o bien, directamente, con las personas que la generan (redes sociales).

Invitamos a académicos, profesionales y estudiantes a hacer un ejercicio de prospectiva que dé respuesta a preguntas como: ¿Cuáles son las perspectivas de futuro de este nuevo estadio de la sociedad de la información? Se trata de cambios irreversibles o, como ha ocurrido con el regreso del vinilo, aún pueden ser objeto de un replanteamiento? Podría ser que, a largo plazo, la pantalla se convirtiera la vía de acceso a la información de los pobres, mientras que las clases acomodadas optaran por el libro de papel en vez del pdf o por el disco en vez de un archivo mp3?

Esperamos su participación agradeciendo de antemano la atención prestada.

Reciba un cordial saludo,

*El comité organizador*

Dr. Ferran Sáez

Dra. Lluïsa Llamero


Facultad de Comunicación y Relaciones Internacionales Blanquerna

Universitat Ramon Llull

Plaza Joan Corominas, s/n

08001 Barcelona

Tel: (34) 93 253 31 08

Fax: (34) 93 253 31 23

cicr@blanquerna.url.edu <mailto:cicr@blanquerna.url.edu>


______________________________________________________

Assumpte: Convocatòria Realitat i pantalla, un mirall postmodern, IX Congrés Internacional Comunicació i Realitat, Barcelona, 8 i 9 de juny de 2017. Facultat de Comunicació Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Llull

Data límit per a la recepció de resums: 15 de desembre de 2016.

Si us plau feu difusió d’aquest missatge en el vostre departament i entre els vostres col·legues que puguin estar interessats en aquest congrés.


Benvolgut/Benvolguda,

L'organització de la IXa. edició del Congrés Internacional de Comunicació i Realitat que es celebrarà els dies 8 i 9 de juny de 2017, a la Facultat de Comunicació Blanquerna-URL de Barcelona amb el títol Realitat i pantalla, un mirall postmodern, us comunica que ja està obert el termini per enviar les propostes de comunicació o bé de panell mitjançant el web del Congrés: http://cicr.blanquerna.edu/ca/presentacio/ <http://cicr.blanquerna.edu/ca/presentacio/>on trobareu, entre d'altres primeres informacions, la convocatòria o call for papers.

La centralitat que ha adquirit la pantalla en la darrera dècada implica un canvi cultural de caràcter qualitatiu, i marca un punt d’inflexió en el procés massiu i generalitzat de digitalització. La pantalla en si mateixa és un fenomen que mereix una atenció diferenciada i específica ja que modifica la mateixa naturalesa de la informació. La pantalla implica connexiói cada cop més, també interacció, sigui amb la informació (hipertext) o bé, directament, amb les persones que la generen (xarxes socials).

La propera edició del Congrés Internacional de “Comunicació i Realitat” 2017, proposa el temaReality and screen: a postmodern mirror. Convidem a acadèmics, professionals i estudiants a fer un exercici de prospectiva que doni resposta a questions com: Quines són les perspectives de futur d’aquest nou estadi de la societat de la informació? Es tracta de canvis irreversibles o, com ha passat amb el retorn del vinil, encara poden ser objecte d’un replantejament? Podria ser que, a llarg termini, la pantalla esdevingués la via d’accés a la informació dels pobres, mentre que les classes benestants optessin pel llibre de paper en comptes del PDF o pel disc en comptes d’un arxiu mp3?

Esperem la vostra participació i agraïm per endavant l'atenció prestada.

Rebeu una cordial salutació,


*El comité organitzador *Dr. Ferran Sáez Dra. Lluïsa Llamero


Facultat de Comunicació i Relacions Internacionals Blanquerna

Universitat Ramon Llull

Valldonzella, 23

08001 Barcelona

Tel: (34) 93 253 31 08

Fax: (34) 93 253 31 23

cicr@blanquerna.url.edu <mailto:cicr@blanquerna.url.edu>
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Conference CFP: Contemporary Spanish Screen Media and Responses to Crisis and Aftermath



Contemporary Spanish Screen Media and Responses to Crisis and Aftermath

University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
Friday 31 March — Saturday 1 April

(linking with VIVA Spanish and Latin American Festival, HOME Arts Centre, Manchester)


CALL for PAPERS

This conference will explore the diverse ways in which Spanish screen media has responded to the recent economic crisis. Since 2008, the economic context of precariousness and its aftermath has brought about shifts in Spanish film production and distribution. These material conditions have resulted in a renewal in the aesthetics of Spanish screen media and in increasingly innovative and experimental forms. Moreover, a new social turn in Spanish cinema, television and new media has re-engaged with questions of social exclusion and belonging, thereby providing a crucial intervention into contemporary political discourses.


Papers of twenty minutes are invited on the following topics:


* New media, image sharing, piracy, creative commons, transmedia practices

* Political filmmaking

* Crowdfunding and cooperative work

* Activism and advocacy

* Surveillance and subveillance

* Changing audiences

* The role of film festivals

* Questions of affect and ethics

* Contemporary representations of gender, race, class, disability

* Emerging modes of production and distribution for cinema

* Interrogating genre

* New critical approaches to Spanish film


Please send proposals of 200 words by 22 December 2016 to both Abigail Loxham abigail.loxham@manchester.ac.uk<mailto:abigail.loxham@manchester.ac.uk> andTom Whittaker t.whittaker@liverpool.ac.uk <mailto:t.whittaker@liverpool.ac.uk>


Organised by the Regional Research Network in Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Cinemas coordinated by Carmen Herrero, Abigail Loxham, Chris Perriam, Duncan Wheeler and Tom Whittaker. Supported by the British Academy. Conference fees will be waived for speakers and for a limited number of postgraduate researchers wishing to attend without giving a paper.
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Call for chapter proposals: Human Rights, Social Movements and Activism in Contemporary Latin American Cinema


Call for chapter proposals for edited volume:

Human Rights, Social Movements and Activism in Contemporary Latin American Cinema

Edited by Antonio Marcio da Silva, PhD and Mariana Cunha, PhD

Can film play an active role in denouncing human rights abuse and exposing the struggle for visibility of different social movements? Each in their own way, Latin American societies have experienced different cycles in implementing and enforcing human rights policies, and more often than not these rights have been strongly violated. Social and activist movements have seen the increasing use of film, video and digital media as a means of campaigning for social justice and protection of vulnerable citizens. Questioning to what extent cinema can impact social transformation can open up new avenues to understanding the subjects of human rights films, be they the oppressed or the violators.

This edited volume seeks original contributions that bring to light the themes of human rights, social movements and activism in the Latin American cinema of the new millennium. Contributions may include the ways in which human rights have been violated by the State, and also how the State has responded to the rise of social movements and activism; the effectiveness of social movements and activism; how transnational issues have had an impact on human rights in the region, such as migration, globalization, economic shifts; or how cinema’s technology and aesthetics have had an impact on the depiction of these issues (for example the use of mobile phones, especially in the case of documentaries).

Particular areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

- Torture and state sanctioned violence and terror

- Memory, trauma and the archive

- Environmental and indigenous rights (i.e. in the Amazon)

- Climate change and human rights

- Public protests and resistance movements

- Armed revolutionary groups

- Marginalized groups: women’s rights (reproductive rights), LGBTT rights, children’s rights, migrant’s rights (internally displaced, refugees)

- Modern slavery

- Contested spaces and collective militant subjectivities

- Social change, justice, reparation and reconciliation

- Activism and advocacy

- The rise of human rights film festivals in Latin America

Chapter length: 5000 to 6000 words (footnotes and bibliographical references included).


Please send your proposal (title, 200-300-word abstract in English, up to 5 bibliographical references, and brief biography) as electronic attachment to the editors (humanrightslacinema@gmail.com) by Dec 10, 2016.

• Notifications of interest in the contribution: by Dec 20, 2016.

• Completed first draft of chapters due February 28, 2017. (Final acceptance will be notified upon completion of blind review of first draft of chapter by April 15, 2017)

• Final submission (after redrafts) August 1, 2017

• Expected publication: 2018

Please note that these and future deadlines are strict due to negotiations with the Publisher.
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CFP for Ruins: UCSB Media Fields Conference


Media Fields Journal is happy to announce the CFP for its biennial conference, taking place on April 6 and 7, 2017. This year, the conference will explore the theme Ruins, and will feature keynotes delivered by Marwan Kraidy (Anthony Shahid Chair of Global Media, Politics, and Culture and Professor of Communication, University of Pennsylvania) and Rahul Mukherjee (Dick Wolf Assistant Professor of Cinema and New Media Studies, University of Pennsylvania).

Submission guidelines and further information can be found on our website: <http://www.mediafieldsjournal.org/call-for-submissions/>https://mediafields.wordpress.com/conferences/media-fields-6-ruins-april6-7-2017/

We look forward to reading your submissions.

Daniel Grinberg, Tyler Morgenstern, and Lisa Han
Media Fields Editorial Collective
Dept. of Film and Media Studies
University of California, Santa Barbara
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VI Congreso Internacional de Investigadores Audiovisuales 20 y 21 de abril 2017
Estimados investigadores,

Les recordamos que disponen hasta el día 30 de enero de 2017 para poder enviar a través de la web la propuesta/resumen de comunicación http://www.ucjc.edu/congreso-internacional-investigadores-audiovisuales/#utab-pane-0-3 para participar en el VI Congreso Internacional de Investigadores Audiovisuales que se celebrará los día 20 y 21 de abril en la Universidad Camilo José Cela en la sede de la C/Almagro nº5.

Será un placer contar con tu presencia.

Toda la información del Congreso: http://www.ucjc.edu/congreso-internacional-investigadores-audiovisuales/
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Call for Proposals: Narratology and its Discontents

Narratology and its Discontents: Narrating Beyond Narration

International Conference

Academy of Dramatic Art, University of Zagreb

6th – 8th April 2017

Conference scope:

The scope of this Conference is intended to represent a wide range of topics related to the study of logic and principles of narrative production, but also to “postclassical” narratology that goes beyond it’s structuralist background focusing on the ways that narrative structures our perception of social and cultural phenomena and helps us construct meaning in general.

We are interested in the contextuality of the modes of narrative representation, in its historicity, and in its pragmatic and artistic functions across different media.

Relevant is the philosophy of action in the theory of narrative, in the narrative as communication, in cross-cultural narration, in cognitive theory of narrative acts, and the concept of performativity in narratology connected to the embodied ways of knowing.

At stake is also narrative explanation in science and knowledge transfer in education, and in a whole range of other topics that transform narratological study into a plethora of different, often interdisciplinary, mixed-method research approaches.

Our special guest is a Dutch cultural theorist, critic, video artist and filmmaker. Mieke Bal. Hence, the motto of our conference is taken from Mieke Bal’s thesis on the use of narratology for cultural analysis where she defines narrative as a cultural attitude, and narratology as a perspective on culture.

“What I propose we are best off with in the age of cultural studies is a conception of narratology that implicates text and reading, subject and object, production and analysis, in the act of understanding. In other words, I advocate a narrative theory that enables the differentiation of the place of narrative in any cultural expression without privileging any medium, mode, or use; that differentiates its relative importance and the effect of the narrative (segments) on the remainder of the object as well as on the reader, listener, viewer. A theory, that is, which defines and describes narrativity, not narrative; not a genre or object but a cultural mode of expression.” (Bal, Narratology Introduction to the Theory of Narrative Second Edition, 1997: 222)

Recommended topics include (but are not limited to) the following:


Classical and Postclassical Narratology
Narrating Film: Narration and Reconstruction of Subjectivity
Performing Narrative in Contemporary Performance Practice and in Daily Life
Narrative Performance and Its Aesthetics
Beyond Mimetic Models: Unnatural Narratology
“Denarration” and Extreme Narration in Contemporary Drama and Fiction
Transmedial Storytelling
Narrative through Nonlinguistic Media
Narrative and Digital Media
Conversational Storytelling
Orality and Narration
Cyberspace Textuality
Narration and Memory
Documentary Storytelling and its (Un)Reliable Narrators
Narrating Violence and Trauma
Visual narratives; Narrative in contemporary visual practice
The Fine Art of Storytelling and Narration in the Fine Art
Cross-cultural Narration and Migrating Selves
Narrative and Embodied Knowing in Dance and Performance
Narrative and Ideology
Political Narratives
Cognitive Narratology: Narrative Thinking, Stories and Minds
Narration in Science – Narration or Science?




Call for Proposals:


Standard Conference Presentations – 15 minutes presentations based on scientific research or practice-led theoretical research.
Art & science presentations with special preference for performative and conceptual artistic, new-media and mixed-media presentations, techno-art presentations and bio-art presentations.(Presentation materials need to be provided by presenters themselves)

Proposals for all formats need to be submitted by

Sunday February 5th 2017
(and will be answered by 6st March 2017)

All submissions will be subject to review.

Please, send your proposal in one (1) single document consisting of the following:
name and surname
university affiliation (if applicable)
proposed presentation title
a presentation abstract (max. 500 words, plus 5 keywords)
a short CV of the author (max. 250 words)

Please ensure that you include your surname as the first word in the file name of the document you send.

Please do not send any additional documents beyond the material requested above.

Send your proposals at: application@artandscienceresearch.hr

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Seminário Georges Didi-Huberman: reverberações de suas ideias

PROGRAMAÇÃO

23/11/2016

09:00 – 12:00 | Reunião de Trabalho com os organizadores e convidados. Proposta de trabalho sobre a obra de G. Didi -Huberman para novembro de 2017

Local: Instituto de Artes – Auditório da Pós Graduação

14:00 – 14:45 | Abertura: Jorge Coli

Local: Auditório II do IFCH

14:45 – 15:45 | Mesa 4 – Imagem e História

Fernanda Pitta
Qual Warburg? As posições de Didi Huberman e Carlo Ginzburg ante o problema da história

Taísa Palhares
Da imagem dialética à sobrevivência das imagens: a história da arte depois de Walter Benjamin segundo Georges Didi-Huberman

15:45 – 16:15 | Debates

16:15 – 17:30 | Mesa 5 – Encerramento


Organizadores e Relatores
Conclusões do Seminário

-------


22/11/2016

09: 30 – 10:00 | Mesa de Abertura – Local: Auditório IEL

10:00 – 12:30 | Mesa 1- Reverberações das ideias de Georges Didi-Huberman

Vera Lucia de Carvalho Casa Nova
Recortando Georges Didi-Huberman: um vol – d’oiseau sobre a obra do filósofo

Stéphane Denis A. R. Huchet
G. Didi-Huberman: procurando o movimento na história da arte

Marcio Seligmann-Silva
Imagens sublimes e temporalidades do trauma em Georges Didi-Huberman: encontros com Warburg, Freud e Benjamin

12:30 – 13:00 | Debates

13:00 – 14:00 | Almoço

14:00 – 14:30 | Abertura Fernando Hashimoto

Local: Auditório do Instituto de Artes

14:30 – 15:30 | Mesa 2 – A sobrevivência das imagens

Lais Myrrha
Algumas ideias sobre rastros e vestígios

Maria José de Azevedo Marcondes
O pensamento de Lina Bo Bardi : um possível diálogo com a obra de Georges Didi- Huberman

15:30 – 16:00 | Debates

16:00 -16:30 | Café

16:30 – 17:30 | Mesa 3 – Imagem e Representação: mapeando discursos

Tania Rivera
Ensaio e história da arte

Ilana Feldman
Imagens apesar de tudo: problemas e polêmicas em torno da representação, de “Shoah” a “O filho de Saul”

17:30 – 18:00 | Debates


-----



Organização e Curadoria:

Prof. Dr. Marcio Seligmann-Silva
Departamento de Teoria Literária do Instituto de Estudos da Linguagem – IEL/UNICAMP

Profa. Dra. Maria José de Azevedo Marcondes
Departamento de Artes Plásticas do Instituto de Artes – IA/UNICAMP

Profa. Dra. Taisa Helena Pascale Palhares
Departamento de Filosofia do Instituto de Filosofia e Ciências Humanas – IFCH/UNICAMP


Mais informações: https://www.iar.unicamp.br/evento/seminariogdh2016

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PhD Studentships in Media, Communication and Cultural Studies at Newcastle University

The School of Arts and Cultures at Newcastle University seeks outstanding applicants for our PhD programmes in Media, Communication and Cultural Studies. Fully-funded by *the AHRC’s Northern Bridge Doctoral Training Partnership*, successful students will be joining one of the strongest research units in the country and have the chance to progress their careers in a dynamic, creative and supportive environment.

The School invites applications in all areas of media, communication and cultural study but we are particularly interested in students who can help us build on our existing areas of research excellence in:

Journalism studies

Political communication

Intimacy, personal relationships and media

Digital culture and media studies

Gender, identities, masculinities, and culture/media

Critical discourse analysis

To be eligible, you will need to hold an excellent undergraduate degree, have completed or be completing a Master’s degree in a relevant subject area, and have exciting plans for an original and significant PhD project. Being able to demonstrate a strong fit with our existing expertise and/or our unique research infrastructure will give you a clear advantage.

Students benefit from disciplinary and generic research training within an award-winning postgraduate research training programme within the Humanities and Social Sciences Higher Education Academy. Our PhD students also play a key role in our research culture including the Gender Research Group and other research networks such as the University’s Postcolonial Research and Cultural Significance of Place Groups. Our facilities include Culture Lab, a focal point for research in human-computer interaction and digital creative practice.

Studentships will be awarded on a competitive basis, are fully-funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council as part of the Northern Bridge Doctoral Training Partnership and include a tax free maintenance grant of £14,296p.a.

If you would like more information, please contact our Postgraduate Administrator by emailing nicola.holkham@ncl.ac.uk<mailto:nicola.holkham@ncl.ac.uk> or the subject area contact joss.hands@ncl.ac.uk <mailto:joss.hands@ncl.ac.uk> for more detail see Northern Bridge Doctoral Training Partnership: http://www.northernbridge.ac.uk/

Deadline for applications: 5pm, Wed 11^th January 2017
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AHRC studentships in Media & Communication at the University of Liverpool


The Department of Communication and Media <https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/communication-and-media/> in the School of the Arts <https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/arts/> at the University of Liverpool is pleased to invite applications for postgraduate funding (Masters and PhDs) for programmes commencing in October 2017 in _Media and Communication_. Studentships are funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) via the North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership (NWCDTP) <http://www.nwcdtp.ac.uk/>.

We particularly welcome research proposals which relate to our research strengths in the following areas:

* media and entertainment industries (emphasis on Hollywood and
independent film)
* cinema as art
* political communication
* sociolinguistics, communication and language
* media and war
* media and human rights
* gender and media
* history of broadcasting and public affairs programmes
* newmedia and digital communication
* urban cultural studies and digital spatialities
* film, space and place


For further details of postgraduate research opportunities in the Department of Communication and Media see: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/communication-and-media/postgraduate-research/ <https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/communication-and-media/staff/>

The University of Liverpool is part of a North West Consortium which has been awarded £14 million by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) to train a new generation of skilled researchers. The NWCDTP brings together the Universities of Liverpool, Keele, Lancaster, Manchester, Manchester Metropolitan, Salford and the Royal Northern College of Music, awarding around 200 PhD studentships over a five year period.

For further details on academic and residential eligibility, and details of how to apply, please see NWCDTP webpage. <http://www.nwcdtp.ac.uk/>

For submission of applications and any queries, please contact hsspgr@liv.ac.uk <mailto:hsspgr@liv.ac.uk>.
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'Cinema, Memory and the Community' workshop


'Cinema, Memory and the Community' - First free workshop - 15th December

Registration now open - Travel bursaries available


This project, funded by the British Academy, will use two free workshops and a dedicated online portal to bring together academics, public groups and private businesses interested in the ways cinemas sit within and recur throughout our memories. It will build a new network of interested partners, inspire future collaborations and support the exchange of knowledge, skills and expertise.

Two workshops, on 15th December 2016 and 23rd February 2017, will offer the first opportunities for such broad-based dialogue and collaboration in the emerging field of cinema memories. Participants who are working in this area, or who are interested in it as a future possibility for their work, are very welcome to join us.

As the project develops, its website will become an online hub for cinema memories work, collecting sample documents from existing projects and training videos, while also offering an online forum where information can be shared and questions answered. It is hoped that, as the website evolves, it will support, facilitate and inspire the collection of cinema memories by an increasing range of people, both within and beyond our universities.

Further details of the project and links to sign up to attend the workshops are available here: http://www.cinemamemories.org<http://www.cinemamemories.org/>

Travel bursaries are available to support those who would otherwise not be able to attend. Details and an application form can be found here: http://cinemamemories.org/Workshops/bursaries.html

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Calls for Chapters: Women Who Kill

Calls for Chapters: Women Who Kill in English-speaking Cinema and TV Series of the Postfeminist Era

Within the fields of film and television studies, feminist critics and scholars of the 1980s and 1990s have extensively analyzed the figures of women murderers in classical film genres like film noir and melodrama, as well as in less savory genres like the horror films of the 1970s and 1980s. Such figures, often adapted from literary sources (/The Maltese Falcon/, /Leave Her to Heaven/,/Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?/, /Tess of the D’Urbervilles/), have existed since the silent era. Yet what may have been an exception seems to be becoming more common. Women who kill abound in contemporary films and TV shows, including /Butterfly Kiss/ (Michael Winterbottom, 1995), /The Wire/ (HBO, 2002-2008), /Kill Bill/ (Quentin Tarantino, 2003-2004), /Monster/ (Patty Jenkins, 2003), /Lost/ (ABC, 2004-2010), /Jennifer’s Body/ (Karyn Kusama, 2009), /Bathory/ (Juraj Jakubisko, 2008), /Luther/ (BBC, 2010-), /The Hunger Games/ (2012-2015), /The Americans/ (FX, 2013-), /Orange Is the New Black/ (Netflix, 2013-), /Prisoners/ (Denis Villeneuve, 2013) and /Gone Girl/ (David Fincher, 2014).

The increasing number of these characters probably goes hand in hand with the increasing number of strong female heroines. Far from displaying gratuitous violence by women, some of these contemporary works justify or, at least try to explain, why the murders happened in the first place (as an act of revenge, an answer to their oppression, a way to fit in their environment, an expression of their psychotic personalities, and so forth), while others tend to question these very motives.Seeing as many of today’s producers, filmmakers and screenwriters have gone through film school, it is more than likely that many are aware of the theses developed in feminist film and television studies; Diablo Cody, for instance, admitted having Barbara Creed’s /Monstrous-Feminine/ in mind when writing the screenplay for /Jennifer’s Body/. The series and films are also, no doubt, reacting to discourses that have been widely circulating in the media, and that testify to the impact queer, gender and feminist studies have had on popular culture at large. Another contemporary phenomenon that must be taken into account is postfeminism, a “market-led phenomenon” which, by promoting female success stories, seems to “lead to the conclusion that the time for feminism is past” (Gamble 42-44). These women who kill may simply be symptomatic of postfeminist trends.

This collected volume will explore several lines of inquiry: the female murderer as a figure that destabilizes order; the tension between criminal and victim; the relationship between crime and expression (or the lack thereof); and the paradox whereby a crime can be both an act of destruction and a creative assertion of agency. It will also aim at assessing the influence of feminist, queer and gender studies on mainstream television and cinema, notably in the genres (film noir, horror, melodrama) that have received the most critical attention from this perspective, but more importantly perhaps, at analyzing the politics of representation by considering these works of fiction in their contexts and addressing some of the ambiguities raised by postfeminism.

Proposals must include a 300-500-word abstract, a short bibliography and a bio, and should be sent to the editors by December 31, 2016:

Zachary Baqué: zachary.baque@univ-tlse2.fr <mailto:zachary.baque@univ-tlse2.fr>

Cristelle Maury: cristellemaury@gmail.com <mailto:cristellemaury@gmail.com>

David Roche: mudrock@neuf.fr <mailto:mudrock@neuf.fr>

Selected Bibliography

Andrin, Muriel. /Maléfiques, le mélodrame filmique américain et ses héroines, 1940-1953, /Bruxelles, Berne, Berlin: Peter Lang, 2005.

Birch, Helen, ed. /Moving Targets Women Murder and Representation/. Berkeley: U of California P, 1994.

Burfoot and Lord, eds. /Killing Women: The Visual Culture of Gender and Violence/. Waterloo: Wilfried Laurier, 2006.

Cadiet, Loïc, ed. /Figures de femmes criminelles : De l'Antiquité à nos jours/. Paris: Publications de la Sorbonne, 2010.

Cardi, Coline and Geneviève Pruvost, eds. /Penser la violence des femmes/. Paris: La Découverte, 2012.

Clover, Carol. J. /Men, Women and Chain Saws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film/. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton UP, 1992.

Cowie, Elizabeth. “/Film Noir /and Women.” /Shades of Noir: a Reader/. Ed. Joan Copjec. London and New York: Verso, 1993. 121-65.


Creed, Barbara. /The Monstrous-Feminine: Film, Feminism, Psychoanalysis/. London and New York: Routledge, 1993.

---. /Phallic Panic: Film, Horror and the Primal Uncanny/. Manchester: Manchester UP, 2005.

De Lauretiis, Teresa. /Alice Doesn’t: Feminism, Semiotics, Cinema/. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1984.

Doane, Mary Ann. /Femmes Fatales: Feminism, Film Theory, Psychoanalysis/. London and New York: Routledge, 1991.

Gamble, Sarah, ed. /The Routledge Companion to Feminism and Postfeminism/. London and New York: Routledge, 2001.

Grant, Barry Keith, ed. /The Dread of Difference: Gender and the Horror Film/. Austin: U of Texas P, 1996.

Grossman, Julie. /Rethinking the Femme Fatale: Ready For Her Close-Up/.//London: Palgrave, 2009.

Halberstam, Judith. /Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of the Monster/. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1995.

---. /Female Masculinity/. Durham, NC and London: Duke UP, 1998.

Hanson, Helen. /Hollywood Heroines Women in Film Noir and the Female Gothic Film/. London and New York: I. B. Tauris 2008.

Hanson Helen and Catherine O’Rawe. /The Femme Fatale: Images, Histories, Contexts/.//London: Palgrave, 2010.

Hildenbrand, Karen, ed. /Cycnos/ 23.2 (2006) “Figures de femmes assassines, représentations et idéologies.” <http://revel.unice.fr/cycnos/index.html?id=618>.

hooks, bell. /Real to Reel: Race, Class and Sex at the Movies/. New York and London: Routledge, 2009 [1996].

Inness, Sherrie A. /Tough Girls: Women Warriors and Wonder Women in Popular Culture/. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1998.

---, ed. /Action Chicks: New Images of Tough Women in Popular Culture/. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.

Jones, Ann. /Women Who Kill/. Boston: Beacon Press, 1996.

Kaplan E Ann, ed. /Women in Film Noir. /London: BFI, 1978.

Kuhn, Annette. /Women’s Pictures: Feminism and Cinema/. London and New York: Verso, 1993.

Modleski, Tania. /Loving with a Vengeance/. London and New York: Routledge, 2006.

Nalepa, Laurie and Richard Pfefferman. /The Murder Mystique: Female Killers and Popular Culture/. Wesport, CO and London: Praeger, 2013.

Parker L. Juli, ed. /Representations of Murderous Women in Literature, Theatre, Film and Television: Examining the Patriarchal Presuppositions Behind the Treatment of Murderesses in Fiction and Reality/. Lewinston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press Ltd, 2010.

Plain, Gill. /Twentieth-Century Crime Fiction: Gender, Sexuality and the Body/. Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 2001.

Rosalind, Gill. /Gender and the Media/. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2006.

Rosalind Gill and Christina Scharff, eds. New Femininities: /Postfeminism, Neoliberalism and Subjectivity. /Basingstone, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.

Russo, Mary. /The Female Grotesque: Risk, Excess and Modernity/. New York and London: Routledge, 1995.

Seal, Lizzie. /Women, Murder and Femininity: Representations of Women Who Kill/. London and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

Stables, Kate. “The Postmodern Always Rings Twice: Constructing the /Femme Fatale /in 90s Cinema.” /Women in Film Noir. /Ed. E. Ann Kaplan. London: BFI, 1998. 164-82.

Tasker Yvonne. “Women in Film Noir.” /A Companion to Film Noir/.//Ed. Andrew Spicer and Helen Hanson. Chichester: Wiley Blackwell, 2013. 353-68.

---. /Soldiers’ Stories: Military Women in Cinema and Television Since World War II/. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2011.

Walker, Janet. “Hollywood, Freud and the Representation of Women: Regulations and Contradiction, 1945-early 60s.” /Home is Where the Heart is/,/Studies in Melodrama and the Woman's Film/. Ed. Christine Gledhill. London: BFI, 1994. 197-214.

Wallace, Marilyn. /Sisters in Crime/. New York: Berkley Books, 1989.

Williams, Linda. “When the Woman Looks.” /The Dread of Difference: Gender in the Horror Film/. Ed. Barry Keith Grant. Austin, TX: U of Texas P, 1996: 15-34.

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CfP: "Re-Animation. Contemporary Animation between Cinema and New Media"
Call for Papers Journal “Imago. Studi di cinema e media”, 16/2017 

(University of Rome “Roma Tre” - Sapienza University of Rome, Bulzoni Publishing)

Re-Animation. Contemporary Animation between Cinema and New Media *edited by Christian Uva and Paul Wells

Animation has, in the 21st century, become «the dominant logic of the moving image» (Lamarre). Contemporary animation in fact is the audiovisual spacewhereseveral crucial challenges are playing out,from technological, aesthetic, narrative, political, and cultural pointsof view.

While contemporary animation retainsome basic elements fromthe tradition,albeit within a new level of sophistication, itnevertheless continues to represent an experimental field in terms ofboththe visual and the aural. These two aspects have received new life from the phenomenon of digitalization of the whole audiovisual sector and the pervasive image manipulation that also made live action cinema no longer distinguishable from animation (Manovich). Thoughfrom1995 (the year of /Toy Story/)computer technology integrateditselfprofoundlywithindigital animation, several enclavesneverthelessremain,which haveproudly“resisted” the domination of computers, andcontinueto favor traditional practices (as inHayao Miyazaki’s paradigmatic example). Although animationwas once considered an ancillary genre of cinema,it has somehow inverted that role,re-statingits identity.«Once attractional art par excellence, today it inherits the best narrative tradition of classic Hollywood» (Alonge-Amaducci). No longer is it considered a specific, separate and secondary genre (that is mostly intended for a youngaudience), but rather “brother” (although not twin) of live action cinema (Bendazzi), a set of techniques and expressive forms through which itis possible to configure any type of narration (or anti-narration), to practice any kind of genre, andtocolonize any medium and format. In fact, «At every point of social, cultural and artistic development, animation has expressed the continuing tension between a medium in which innovation and creativity can continually take place while aligning with, and depicting the most human of needs, desires, thoughts and feelings» (Wells).

This issue of “Imago. Studi di cinema e media” proposes a series ofbroadreflections within this context, focusing, for reasons of space,on the areas of “animated cartoons” and computer animation within the broader andmore varied animation system. The issue will examine the dynamics and mechanisms that underliesuccessful, mainstream animations in film and television, but also "underground" products that take advantage of alternative distribution channels. By paying particular attention to the link between theories and practices, we want to investigate the styles, technologies, and aesthetics of new animated products;and the dialectic between tradition and innovation– which weseek toexamine from the perspective of creative activities, such as realization and production. The aim is to keep in mind the fundamental link between modes of production and modes of expression, not to mention modes of reception. Particular attention will be given to the narrative, aesthetic, and cultural aspects that distinguish in particular the films produced by the new Majors of animation (Pixar, DreamWorks, Blue Sky Studios, Illumination Entertainment, etc.) in connectionwith,or opposition to, those coming from other parts of the world (such as Japan or France). The issue will similarly focuson successfultelevision products. With regard to such phenomena, we hope to study: their connections to the new star and studio systems, as well as the dialectic between the authorial and industrial dimensionswith regard to genres and languages; issues related to identity, ideology, gender, race and ethnicity, with a focus on the link between national and transnational scenarios; the philosophical implications of the relationship between human and post-human, to understand if and how new animation still continues to favor «a conception of man not yet shackled by logic, reasonor experience» (Ėjzenštejn). Wemoreover encourage reflections on new production contexts and conditions,and more specifically the economic and business and their relation to the crucial question of merchandising. A further area of potential studycould focus on theoretical debates, in order to understand the position and the identity of animation within the film and media studiestoday.

Topics:

Theories of practice, practices of theory

Cultures and styles of animation studios

Authorship vs studios

Creative models, between tradition and innovation

Technologies, between digital and traditional animation

Languages and modes of scriptwriting

Genres

Transnational and global scenarios

National and postnational imaginary

Ideologies

Identities

Race, ethnicity, gender

Posthumanism

Contexts and conditions of production

Cross-platform delivery and its applications

Reception and fandom

Merchandising

Please send 200 word proposals in italian or english with short biogs by January 8, 2017 to christian.uva@uniroma3.it <mailto:christian.uva@uniroma3.it>

Completed essays in italian or english (6500 words) will be due by April 30, 2017.

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CFP: Audiences2030: Imagining a future for audiences

Audiences 2030: Imagining a future for audiences End of project conference for the AHRC CEDAR network, in association with Universidade Católica Portuguesa, the Audience and Reception Studies section of ECREA, and YECREA

Date: 28th and 29th September 2017

Venue: Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Lisbon, Portugal

Keynote speakers: Sonia Livingstone, Martin Barker, Thomas Tufte, Klaus Bruhn Jensen

Highlight Plenary: End of Project launch panel for the CEDAR network's findings Conference Fee Bands:
Option 1: 70 Euros (with lunch and refreshments);
Option 2: 95 Euros (conference dinner, lunch and refreshments);
Option 3: 35 Euros (non-presenting attendee fee).

At a time of political and socio-cultural flux in Europe, Audiences 2030 brings together researchers taking diverse approaches to researching audiences, to ask what needs (re)doing in the ways in which we research audiences, the ways in with we mobilise theory, and the extent to which we think of future challenges to a rapidly changing field. Audiences 2030 is the end-of-project conference for CEDAR - the Consortium on Emerging Directions in Audience Research (funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council) and will see a highlight plenary from CEDAR launch the outcomes of its unique foresight exercise about the future of audience research in 2030. The conference will see keynote speeches from Sonia Livingstone, Martin Barker, Thomas Tufte and Klaus Bruhn Jensen.


In our call for papers we are particularly keen to see a futuristic outlook - whatever project we speak from, we would like to see it contextualised in contemporary complexities (intellectual, socio-cultural, political), and geared towards future challenges. Topics in our CFP include but are not restricted to - EU politics, democracy and media audiences. Audiences' new literacies, capabilities and coping strategies with digital media Contemporary political complexities and audience studies Digital interfaces and their implications for 'audience' studies Speaking to stakeholders in audience research Race, class, gender and religion in audience studies Youthful audiences Invisible, marginalised and under researched audiences Social action, movements and audiences Co-option of audience labour Audiences, media regulation and media policy New forms of media engagement The role of texts in contemporary audience research Cross-media audiences Methodological and theoretical innovations For each of this (or indeed, other topics), we particularly welcome papers thinking about the future, including socio-political challenges, anticipated technological changes and implications for research. Our conference also includes a workshop or PhD students co-hosted by YECREA.


Please submit 250 word abstracts on https://goo.gl/Lx01fJ. The last date for submissions is 30th March 2017. We plan to announce results by 15th May 2017. Ranjana Das (Director, CEDAR), Brita Ytre-Arne (Co-Director, CEDAR), David Mathieu, Ana Jorge, Ines Amaral, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, the Audience and Reception Studies section of ECREA and YECREA.
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